Intent of the Lesson Plan

To recognize that magnets have polarity, and that poles my either repel or attract each other.

Alberta Curriculum Level

Time Needed

15 - 30 minutes

Subject

Summary of this Lesson Plan

By “being the magnets”, we can get a very good sense of the rules that magnets follow.

Related Topics

Materials Needed

 

Suggested Process for Using the Model

  • Refer to the “suggested process” from the Standard Lesson Plan.
  • Question Ideas: What do we call the magnetic poles? What happens when we put 2 magnets together? Will the positive poles attract each other or repel?
  • The model will use pairs of students to be magnets. Each magnet will need two cards, one that has “+” on it and one that has “-” . The students will be moving around, governed by the rules of the magnets. That is, opposites attract and like repels.

 

Part 1: Setting Up the Model

  • Refer to the “setup process” from the Standard Lesson Plan.
  • Bring up pairs of students to be the magnets. /own space
  • Give each pair a set of the cards.
  • Teacher plays the animator.

 

Part 2: Moving the Magnets

  • Refer to “animating the models” from the Standard Lesson Plan.
  • Start the model by putting the students in the setup position – (line and group)
  • Animator Notes: The animator talks through the process, introducing the magnets and pointing out that each one has a positive and negative pole. Also, mention the rule of how they relate to each other.
  • Have the magnets move and try to keep the rule in mind. Each one will influence others.· Try doing it first with only 2-3 magnets, and then add more.

 

 

Part 3: Making Shapes with the Magnets

  • In this variation, the animator assigns a shape that must be created by putting all the magnets together – a line, a U shape, and an L shape. The students must combine the magnets to create the shape, linking the magnets, of course, by the attract/repel rule.
  • How would a T shape work? Could it work?
  • Start the model by putting the students in the setup position – (line and group)
  • The animator talks through the process, introducing the magnets and the shape that will be created. The magnets need to move one at a time to get into position.

 

 

Drama Tips!

 

 Refer to “Drama Tips!” from the Standard Lesson Plan.

 Give the parts of the model lots of personality by having the students create sayings and actions that are appropriate to each object. (“I’m the positive end of the magnet and I’m just soooo positive!!)

 Animate the story. (Animator: “Look at those two negative poles pushing away from each other – they just don’t like to be together!”)

 

Ways to Extend the Model

  • Refer to “ways to extend the model” from the Standard Lesson Plan.
  • Add in pieces of steel. How does that affect it?
  • Change the strength of some of the magnets.

 

Reinforcement Activities and Evaluation Questions

  • Refer to the “reinforcement activities and evaluation questions” from the Standard Lesson Plan.
  • Additional Activities
    • Have them write, draw, or tell a story related to a magnet having to live and move by these rules (“I’m just minding my own business and along comes this big magnet with the negative pole pointed toward me. Well, I’m a negative pole too, so I just had to move away. I got slammed up against a wall, because the other one was so powerful.”)
  • Additional Questions
    • What is the attract/repel rule that magnets live by?
    • Why did you move that way?
    • What will happen is you as a negative pole if you meet a positive pole?
    • How are two poles that are the same going to react?

 

External Resources

Mini-Plays

Short 5-10 minute plays linked to the Act2Learn lesson plans. Each mini-play is designed to involve the entire class.